COW BARN
AND
HORSE BARN

COW BARN at Oakley Farm

This barn is post and beam construction as evidenced in the photos. It means that the barn is
put together with the beams not nailed but using the pegging method. It was built circa 1820
as evidenced by the cement floor. 1820 was when Portland cement started to be used for
flooring instead of dirt. It was easier to keep clean.


The 2 nd floor of the barn is the hayloft which is accessible by the large hay doors inside the
breezeway between the blacksmith shop and barn. The wagon full of hay would be driven
inside and the bails of hay would be unloaded into the loft. The only inside access to the loft is
by the ladders attached to the walls inside the barn

HORSE BARN at Oakley Farm
This structure, like the cow barn, is also circa 1820. It is also of Post and Beam construction. The
difference is that this one is a bit larger and has several more components in it. The hayloft is
the same as the cow barn however, there are more doors on 2 nd floor to access the hay.


Also housed in this barn is the cistern-it was a way of collecting rainwater to use inside the
house as well as to feed the animals.


Originally there was a windmill located on the North end
of the barn. It was the spot where Mr. Charles Oaklely had his accident as he got caught in the
windmill and fell into the cistern. He died 9 days later.


While the Oakley family lived here they had 4 Pergeron horses to help with the field work.
There are pictures of them inside the house.


Along the outside of the barn (West side) there is a rain garden. This was an Eagle Scout project
that was put in place to help replenish the natural acquifers underground.  See our Rain Garden section to learn more about them and to see how you can make your own.

 

COW BARN

This barn is post and beam construction as evidenced in the photos. It means that the barn is
put together with the beams not nailed but using the pegging method. It was built circa 1820
as evidenced by the cement floor. 1820 was when Portland cement started to be used for
flooring instead of dirt. It was easier to keep clean.
The 2 nd floor of the barn is the hayloft which is accessible by the large hay doors inside the
breezeway between the blacksmith shop and barn. The wagon full of hay would be driven
inside and the bails of hay would be unloaded into the loft. The only inside access to the loft is
by the ladders attached to the walls inside the barn

Horse barn at Oakley Farm
This structure like the cow barn is also circa 1820. It is also of Post and Beam construction. The
difference is that this one is a bit larger and has several more components in it. The hayloft is
the same as the cow barn however, there are more doors on 2 nd floor to access the hay.
Also housed in this barn is the cistern-it was a way of collecting rainwater to use inside the
house as well as to feed the animals. Originally there was a windmill located on the North end
of the barn. It was the spot where Mr. Charles Oaklely had his accident as he got caught in the
windmill and fell into the cistern. He died 9 days later.
While the Oakley family lived here they had 4 Pergeron horses to help with the field work.
There are pictures of them inside the house.
Along the outside of the barn (West side) there is a rain garden. This was an Eagle Scout project
that was put in place to help replenish the natural acquifers underground.